Monday, July 25, 2016

Social Genomics: Better Longevity

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

From The New Yorker:

In 2007, John Cacioppo, a professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago, and Steve Cole, a professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, among others, identified a link between loneliness and how genes express themselves. In a small study, since repeated in larger trials, they compared blood samples from six people who felt socially isolated with samples from eight who didn’t. Among the lonely participants, the function of the genome had changed in such a way that the risk of inflammatory diseases increased and antiviral response diminished. It appeared that the brains of these subjects were wired to equate loneliness with danger, and to switch the body into a defensive state. In historical and evolutionary terms, Cacioppo suggested, this reaction could be a good thing, since it helps immune cells reach infections and encourages wounds to heal. But it is no way to live. Inflammation promotes the growth of cancer cells and the development of plaque in the arteries. It leads to the disabling of brain cells, which raises susceptibility to neurodegenerative disease. In effect, according to Cole, the stress reaction requires “mortgaging our long-term health in favor of our short-term survival.” Our bodies, he concluded, are “programmed to turn misery into death.”
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Thursday, July 21, 2016

The Barrier to Motivation


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Sometimes we are deciding not to decide because we are overwhelmed. Instead of trying to understand why we are feeling this way, we try to overwhelm our sense of being overwhelmed with more motivation. We are not creating a solution, we are exacerbating the problem.

Saturday, July 16, 2016

The Paradox of Enjoyment

Why doing what you like isn't enough


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Since the age of six, I've been training martial arts continuously. Why, when people stop doing things all the time? I've often pondered this when there are so many other things I've stopped doing. Things I've enjoyed more. Is enjoyment the best motivator for commitment? There are a lot of things people enjoy but never do consistently.

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Beyond Hacking: Why Trying Harder Matters


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

A Brief Introduction to "Hacking"


Hacking - Any trick, shortcut, novelty method, bypass, or workaround that increases productivity and efficiency, in all walks of life. Evolving over time; the usage now indicates ways to accelerate workflow and self-improvement.

The obsessive want of shortcuts. The dream of effortlessly perfect efficiency going mainstream.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Why Exercise Should Train Your Coordination

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Coordination should be a main objective in physical fitness and exercise. When we move in new ways, when we exert ourselves, our muscles produce a protein that creates new cells and connections in the brain that is critical for memory.

We knew working the body was good for the brain, we knew about the concept of muscle memory, but until recently they were theories, but new research is providing the proof.

Nothing so far improves the brain like exercise (anything synthetic comes at a high price, including increased risks for Alzheimer's and tumors).

Move a lot, challenge yourself, push yourself, and always move in new ways. If you spent your whole life in the gym but aren't any more coordinated for it, you didn't maximize the full potential of exercise.
___________________________________

My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Thursday, June 16, 2016

Exercise and Fats are "Miracle-Gro" for the Brain

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

In a recent study, researchers explain how exercise boosts the brain's creation of new cells, while also strengthening neural connections.

Part of the explanation was, exercises burns through the body's stores of sugar. What the brain really loves are fats and ketones.

The opposite happens to the brain when sugar stores build and the participant is sedentary (inactive).

So remember, exercise frequently, avoid sugar, and intake healthy fats for a longer and healthier life.
___________________________________

My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Tuesday, June 14, 2016

What Getting Punched in the Face Taught Me



By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Getting punched in the face is rather unpleasant. You should avoid it if at all possible. If you, however, have gotten punched in the face or train in a discipline where you're getting punched in the face constantly, get the most out of it. There are valuable life lessons there, and it would be truly sad if all you got from the experience was a black eye.

Sunday, June 5, 2016

Actions Count More Than Thoughts


In high school, I really liked this girl — let's call her Jane. Actually I wasn't the only one who liked her, two of my other friends did as well. It had gotten to the point where the time for talk was over, it was time for action. We all decided to ask Jane out and see who she would say yes to. Guess who she said yes to? None of us, because none of us asked her out.
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