Monday, August 8, 2016

UAP (Universal Athletic Position)

Live in an athletic stance for as long as you can, and maintain more quality of life for as long as you are capable.


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

The difference between exercises that are mechanical and exercises that are functional may be as simple as whether they are using some variant of the universal athletic position (UAP). Sometimes referred simply as an athletic stance or ready position, it is a position used in nearly all physical activity. Like most children, I was not initially taught this position. It was self-taught through trial and error, in attempts to balance, walk, generate speed, and power. Participation in youth sporting activities only reinforced its importance. The UAP is universal in that, we have all done it.

I, as an able-bodied human-being, have four limbs connected to my torso. It is the seamless interplay and coordination of these drivers in relationship with one another against gravity, where all my movement lie. From the universal athletic position is where sprinters generate their speed, football players generate their power, where dancers draw their grace, and where fighters express their technique. It is the stance I adopt when leaping for my life or fleeing from danger while carrying a child.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

Muscle Mass Antidote to Aging and Weight Loss

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here
At 67 and looking preternaturally younger, Westcott has the same body composition as when he was in his 20s: He’s only about 12 percent fat, compared to an average American man’s 28 percent.

But the key isn’t fat, it’s muscle: His central point is that loss of muscle mass -- whether through inactivity or aging or dieting -- helps lead to many of our ills, from regaining weight to developing diabetes.

But it doesn’t have to be that way, if only we’ll do a modicum of strength training — defined as any exercise that uses resistance to build muscle, from weightlifting to push-ups --  and keep doing it.

Friday, July 29, 2016

Being Unfit Just as Bad for Lifespan as Smoking

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here
Being out of shape could be more harmful to health and longevity than most people expect, according to a new, long-term study of middle-aged men. The study finds that poor physical fitness may be second only to smoking as a risk factor for premature death. 
It is not news that aerobic capacity can influence lifespan. Many past epidemiological studies have found that people with low physical fitness tend to be at high risk of premature death. Conversely, people with robust aerobic capacity are likely to have long lives. 
[...] 
The men in the group with the lowest VO2 max had a 21 percent higher risk of dying prematurely than those with middling aerobic capacity, and about a 42 percent higher risk of early death than the men who were the most fit. 
Poor fitness turned out to be unhealthier even than high blood pressure or poor cholesterol profiles, the researchers found. Highly fit men with elevated blood pressure or relatively unhealthy cholesterol profiles tended to live longer than out-of-shape men with good blood pressure and cholesterol levels.
From The New York Times
___________________________________

My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

Share this:

Monday, July 25, 2016

Social Genomics: Better Longevity

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

From The New Yorker:

In 2007, John Cacioppo, a professor of psychology and behavioral neuroscience at the University of Chicago, and Steve Cole, a professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, among others, identified a link between loneliness and how genes express themselves. In a small study, since repeated in larger trials, they compared blood samples from six people who felt socially isolated with samples from eight who didn’t. Among the lonely participants, the function of the genome had changed in such a way that the risk of inflammatory diseases increased and antiviral response diminished. It appeared that the brains of these subjects were wired to equate loneliness with danger, and to switch the body into a defensive state. In historical and evolutionary terms, Cacioppo suggested, this reaction could be a good thing, since it helps immune cells reach infections and encourages wounds to heal. But it is no way to live. Inflammation promotes the growth of cancer cells and the development of plaque in the arteries. It leads to the disabling of brain cells, which raises susceptibility to neurodegenerative disease. In effect, according to Cole, the stress reaction requires “mortgaging our long-term health in favor of our short-term survival.” Our bodies, he concluded, are “programmed to turn misery into death.”
___________________________________

My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

Share this:

Thursday, July 21, 2016

The Barrier to Motivation


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Sometimes we are deciding not to decide because we are overwhelmed. Instead of trying to understand why we are feeling this way, we try to overwhelm our sense of being overwhelmed with more motivation. We are not creating a solution, we are exacerbating the problem.

Saturday, July 16, 2016

The Paradox of Enjoyment

Why doing what you like isn't enough


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Since the age of six, I've been training martial arts continuously. Why, when people stop doing things all the time? I've often pondered this when there are so many other things I've stopped doing. Things I've enjoyed more. Is enjoyment the best motivator for commitment? There are a lot of things people enjoy but never do consistently.

Saturday, July 9, 2016

Beyond Hacking: Why Trying Harder Matters


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

A Brief Introduction to "Hacking"


Hacking - Any trick, shortcut, novelty method, bypass, or workaround that increases productivity and efficiency, in all walks of life. Evolving over time; the usage now indicates ways to accelerate workflow and self-improvement.

The obsessive want of shortcuts. The dream of effortlessly perfect efficiency going mainstream.

Thursday, June 23, 2016

Why Exercise Should Train Your Coordination

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Coordination should be a main objective in physical fitness and exercise. When we move in new ways, when we exert ourselves, our muscles produce a protein that creates new cells and connections in the brain that is critical for memory.

We knew working the body was good for the brain, we knew about the concept of muscle memory, but until recently they were theories, but new research is providing the proof.

Nothing so far improves the brain like exercise (anything synthetic comes at a high price, including increased risks for Alzheimer's and tumors).

Move a lot, challenge yourself, push yourself, and always move in new ways. If you spent your whole life in the gym but aren't any more coordinated for it, you didn't maximize the full potential of exercise.
___________________________________

My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

Share this:
All Out Effort is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.