Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Too Much Exercise and Weight Gain

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

New research reveals that there is a set amount of calories a person can burn in the day. Exercising more than that will not help you lose weight, in fact, it may only make you hungrier. This explains why so often, people gain weight when they begin going to the gym. For years they blamed it on putting on muscle, but more likely, they unconsciously began eating more and taking more meal supplements like protein shakes and energy drinks that are full of sugar. People also tend to eat more than usual if they exercised because they believe overeating can be counterbalanced with exercise.
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Thursday, February 4, 2016

The Complexity of Health Should Not Be Discounted

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

A hedge fund manager asked me for some tips and tricks to lose weight fast.

I asked him for some tips and hacks to get rich. He laughed and found my question a bit insulting. He said it's too complicated to be explained in simple tricks and hacks. I asked him, "But somehow the body is super simple?"

Health is similar to economics and just as complicated. The thing people do not understand is scarcity, and that choices are trade-offs. Also risk exposure vs. reward. Your body is also constantly redistributing and reallocating to maintain its set-point. If you really look at the numbers, there are more people who have been able to get rich and keep the money than their are people who have been able to lose the weight and keep it off. Actually the amount of people who lose weight and keep it off is statistically insignificant. That's still not touching on trying to prevent diseases like type 2 diabetes and heart disease. You tell people they are about to lose their house, and there are proven things that will help them keep their house. With certain lifestyle diseases, we don't have those types of proven methods that people will stick to.Yet, somehow, that's the easier thing to understand?

Like financial advice (I used to be an advisor in another life), you sometimes just have to sit with someone more knowledgeable than you and hear them out. That, whatever it is you know is not the totality of everything there is to know. In fact, everything you know about the subject, may be very little. Saying eat less, exercise more, is as overly-simplistic as, buy low, sell high.
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Wednesday, February 3, 2016

Someone Asked Me What's Fat-Shaming?

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

This is a real-life exchange with one of my readers:

ER: Whats fat shaming?

Me: Purposely embarrassing someone about their weight.

ER: Instead of positively reinforcing healthy habits?

Me: Exactly. It's like thoroughly convincing someone they are an idiot then trying to convince them to take an extremely hard test.
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter.

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Thursday, January 28, 2016

The "Science" of the Calorie Is Old and Wrong

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Calories consumed minus calories burned: it’s the simple formula for weight loss or gain. But dieters often find that it doesn’t work.

A guest post by Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley of Gastropod podcast.

“For me, a calorie is a unit of measurement that’s a real pain in the rear.”

Bo Nash is 38. He lives in Arlington, Texas, where he’s a technology director for a textbook publisher. And he’s 5’10” and 245 lbs – which means he is classed as obese.

In an effort to lose weight, Nash uses an app to record the calories he consumes and a Fitbit band to track the energy he expends. These tools bring an apparent precision: Nash can quantify the calories in each cracker crunched and stair climbed. But when it comes to weight gain, he finds that not all calories are equal. How much weight he gains or loses seems to depend less on the total number of calories, and more on where the calories come from and how he consumes them. The unit, he says, has a “nebulous quality to it”.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Fear of Hunger

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

We don't want to starve ourselves, we know the dangers of that. But on the flip-side, we must also embrace hunger. What I mean is, hunger is a natural part of the human experience. It's like our emotions. If you've ever seen the Pixar movie Inside Out, the movie uses real neuroscience to explain that we need all the emotions to have a complete and healthy mind. In avoiding sadness or any other emotion other than happiness, we make ourselves frail and vulnerable. It's the same way with eating, in always avoiding the sensation of hunger, in thinking it's always a problem to be solved and we must always feel full — it only detriments our health. To occasionally be hungry doesn't mean there is something wrong, it means you are a sensory being who is experiencing wholeness. It's a natural part of being alive. In a world where people love extremes, I have to be careful with my words, but I have found that this extreme fear of hunger is what leads people to overcompensate, and eventually fall out of the lifestyle they were trying to live. It needs a little emphasis so we can regain balance. We believe never going hungry means we will live longer, but in reality, it often means the opposite.
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Sunday, January 10, 2016

Like the Bonsai, the Simple Life Extends Your Life

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

A great article from NPR on simple, real world advice you can begin applying now:

"In spite of all the science and technology in medicine, what we doctors do is more about making educated guesses. Especially in primary care, it's often a matter of playing the probabilities more than providing precise diagnostic information.

But prevention is different. We know a lot about it, based on huge bodies of epidemiological research. Most of prevention is fairly straightforward. You've heard the advice again and again. In fact, the repetition may make it easy to tune out.

Thursday, December 24, 2015

When Is the Best Time to Work Out?

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

According to science, it's early in the morning before breakfast.

"There is some evidence that working out on a completely empty stomach — or, as scientists call this woozy, wee-hours condition, "in a fasted state” — prompts the body to burn more fat and potentially stave off weight gain, compared to exercising at other times.

In a groundbreaking 2010 study, researchers in Belgium persuaded young, healthy men to stuff themselves for six weeks with a diet consisting of 30 percent more calories and 50 percent more fat than the men had been eating. Some of the volunteers remained sedentary while gorging. Others began a strenuous, midmorning exercise routine after they had had breakfast. The third group followed the same workout regimen, but before they had eaten anything.

At the end of the six weeks, the sedentary group predictably was supersized and unhealthy, having gained about six pounds each. They had also developed insulin resistance and larded their muscles with new fat cells. The men who exercised after breakfast had also packed on pounds, about three pounds each, and developed insulin problems. But the men who had exercised first thing in the morning, before eating anything, had gained almost no weight and retained healthy insulin levels. Their bodies were also burning more fat throughout the day than were the other men."

Read the rest of the article.
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Personalized Nutrition

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

The New York Times recently did a piece on how the field of "personalized nutrition" may help explain why people respond so differently to diet based on biology.

This is fairly obvious to me and I have written about this extensively but it's been mostly ignored by the media and even by the scientific community. But for it to appeal to the mainstream, the only usefulness they give is weight loss when nutrition and fitness should be so much more than that. Personalized nutrition is more than about weight loss.
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