Sunday, September 25, 2016

On Food Envy

("Ironic Gluttony" | Beckrns)
By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Some Background on Weight Gain

When a human body harvests more energy into fat storage rather than oxidation, is when we have obesity. The problem is not as simple as controlling energy intake and expenditure (calories). Sometimes the body diverts more energy into fat cells, no matter how little energy we take in. Our hormonal responses to food can trigger such an event. Responses to food type and quantity varies from person to person. Sometimes the only difference is the severity of reaction. Some will gain an insignificant amount of weight, while others will gain a considerable amount of weight.

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

English Speaking Countries Tell the World What to Eat

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

When it should be the other way around...

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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Tuesday, September 20, 2016

It Was Easier to be Skinny in the Past

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Even if you eat the same amount of calories (and same volume of nutrients) and exercise exactly the same as Americans 20 to 30 years ago, a new study shows you still won't be as skinny as them.

Some theories include genetic change, exposure to more chemicals, change in food, rise in prescription drug use, and changes to our gut microbiome (which can be influenced from too much sanitation, overuse of antibiotics, chemicals and hormones in foods, and so on).
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Marathon Training Makes Some People Gain Weight

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here
When Mary Kennedy coached a charity team of marathon runners back in 2009, she regularly heard the marathon-weight question. “Several of them would come to me and they would say exactly that: ’I am working out more than I ever have in my entire life. I’m doing this for a lot of reasons, but I really thought I’d look better in my clothes,’” said Kennedy, who is an exercise physiologist at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, a nonprofit research center founded in 2007 by Harvard Medical School and the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital. She conducted a small, simple pilot study, limited to her group of 64 charity runners, comparing their weight before starting the training program to their weight after completing it. About 11 percent of them did lose weight, but just as many gained weight (and of those who gained, 86 percent were women). But for the remaining 78 percent, their weight stayed almost exactly the same, even after three months of running four days a week.

Her results aren’t published yet, but they echo those of a 1989 study in which Danish researchers took 18 months to train a small group of sedentary people — 18 men and nine women — to run a marathon. By race day, the men had lost an average of five pounds. For the women, on the other hand, “no change in body composition was observed,” the researchers write. “This idea that you’re going to run a marathon and the pounds are going to melt away is not realistic,” Kennedy said. She’s currently coaching a group of high-school runners, and she and her co-director have a sad little joke: “You train for the marathon, and then you do the weight-loss program afterward.”
Source: New York Magazine
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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No Carbs at Night

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Contrary to popular opinion, a new study shows that athletes who avoid carbs at night not only perform better athletically but also lose more body fat.
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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter. For more philosophical posts, check out Must Triumph

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Tuesday, September 13, 2016

The Great Sugar Cover-Up

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

An investigative piece from The New York Times:
The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.

The internal sugar industry documents, recently discovered by a researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, and published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine, suggest that five decades of research into the role of nutrition and heart disease, including many of today’s dietary recommendations, may have been largely shaped by the sugar industry.

“They were able to derail the discussion about sugar for decades,” said Stanton Glantz, a professor of medicine at U.C.S.F. and an author of the JAMA paper.

The documents show that a trade group called the Sugar Research Foundation, known today as the Sugar Association, paid three Harvard scientists the equivalent of about $50,000 in today’s dollars to publish a 1967 review of research on sugar, fat and heart disease. The studies used in the review were handpicked by the sugar group, and the article, which was published in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine, minimized the link between sugar and heart health and cast aspersions on the role of saturated fat.

B12 and the Brain

By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

How the lack of the vitamin B12 can lead to mental health issues:
Animal protein foods — meat, fish, milk, cheese and eggs — are the only reliable natural dietary sources of B12, and I do get ample amounts of several in my regular diet. But now at age 75, I wonder whether I’m still able to reap the full benefit of what I ingest.

You see, the ability to absorb B12 naturally present in foods depends on the presence of adequate stomach acid, the enzyme pepsin and a gastric protein called intrinsic factor to release the vitamin from the food protein it is attached to. Only then can the vitamin be absorbed by the small intestine. As people age, acid-producing cells in the stomach may gradually cease to function, a condition called atrophic gastritis.

Sunday, September 4, 2016

I Am Sam's Loser Mindset

How Thinking like a Loser Can Make You a Winner


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

I'm going to tell you a story about what went through my mind during the finals of a competition, but frankly it's what goes through my mind during any intense situation. To boil everything I talk about down into one word, it would be "mindset." Mindset meaning: the established set of attitudes. The attitudes I hold are far from perfect, what they are is functional and productive for my personality.

Whether it's sports, public speaking, or any intense activity, we're told to think like a winner — to own the room and destroy our enemies! That's nice, but I'm only human. A lot of thoughts go through my head very quickly and I can't control them all. Sometimes I have to let go and think what I'm going to think and let it pass on its own. I will never be able to remove all doubts, and I have come to accept them as a part of myself, it's something that keeps me sharp and informed.

I have heard the most dominant champions of MMA say, their mindset before a fight is that of extreme fear and confidence. Not going back and forth between the two feelings, they feel both emotions at once. When they are too relaxed or have no doubts is when they feel complacent and buying into their own hype. Well, I don't know about extreme confidence, but I have the fear part down.
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