Monday, May 5, 2014

Mike Rowe On Chasing Dreams


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Mike Rowe for about 10 years hosted a show called Dirty Jobs. Every show he met different Americans who worked different "dirty" jobs, but in reality in many parts of the country they just called these jobs. Through these experiences, he found that people who worked jobs many of us would consider miserable, were some of the happiest people he had ever met. In contrast to some of the well to do people who had "dream jobs," who always seemed to lack purpose and happiness in their lives.

The Tao of K


I have a client who's a successful Hollywood writer. Let's call him K. When young writers ask him how to break into writing professionally, he tells them to drive a truck for ten years and see what regular people are up to first. They're annoyed when they hear this, as they wanted to know where to hang out, who to network with, who to suck up to, what writing contests to enter, what artsy writing style do they need to adopt. They want to hear that they're already special, all they lack is a connection. K meets "special" people like these every hour. You can't write unless you have some connection to the experiences of regular people. If you have a connection to the people, a voice, and you can't write, then he can teach you. What K can't do is go back in time and give you experiences you don't have or want to have. The young writers he meets are often insulated.

Dirty jobs to perfect jobs


Mike often gets letters from fans asking about living the perfect life or finding the perfect job. Recently Mike gave an amazing response to a fan named Parker and I think it's something we can all relate to.

A fan's letter



Hey Mike! 
I've spent this last year trying to figure out the right career for myself and I still can't figure out what to do. 
I have always been a hands on kind of guy and a go-getter. I could never be an office worker. I need change, excitement, and adventure in my life, but where the pay is steady. I grew up in construction and my first job was a restoration project. I love everything outdoors. I play music for extra money. 
I like trying pretty much everything, but get bored very easily. I want a career that will always keep me happy, but can allow me to have a family and get some time to travel. 
I figure if anyone knows jobs its you so I was wondering your thoughts on this if you ever get the time! Thank you! 
Parker Hall

Mike Rowe's thoughtful response


Hi Parker,

My first thought is that you should learn to weld and move to North Dakota. The opportunities are enormous, and as a "hands-on go-getter," you're qualified for the work. But after reading your post a second time, it occurs to me that your qualifications are not the reason you can't find the career you want.

I had drinks last night with a woman I know. Let's call her Claire. Claire just turned 42. She's cute, smart, and successful. She's frustrated though, because she can't find a man. I listened all evening about how difficult her search has been. About how all the "good ones" were taken. About how her other friends had found their soul-mates, and how it wasn't fair that she had not.

"Look at me," she said. "I take care of myself. I've put myself out there. Why is this so hard?"

"How about that guy at the end of the bar," I said. "He keeps looking at you."

"Not my type."

"Really? How do you know?"

"I just know."

"Have you tried a dating site?" I asked."

"Are you kidding? I would never date someone I met online!"

"Alright. How about a change of scene? Your company has offices all over – maybe try living in another city?"

"What? Leave San Francisco? Never!"

"How about the other side of town? You know, mix it up a little. Visit different places. New museums, new bars, new theaters…?"

She looked at me like I had two heads. "Why the hell would I do that?"

Here's the thing, Parker. Claire doesn't really want a man. She wants the "right" man. She wants a soul-mate. Specifically, a soul-mate from her zip code. She assembled this guy in her mind years ago, and now, dammit, she's tired of waiting!!

I didn't tell her this, because Claire has the capacity for sudden violence. But it's true. 
She complains about being alone, even though her rules have more or less guaranteed she'll stay that way. 
She has built a wall between herself and her goal. A wall made of conditions and expectations. Is it possible that you've built a similar wall?

Consider your own words. You don't want a career – you want the "right" career. You need "excitement" and "adventure," but not at the expense of stability. You want lots of "change" and the "freedom to travel," but you need the certainty of "steady pay." You talk about being "easily bored" as though boredom is out of your control. It isn't. 
Boredom is a choice. Like tardiness. Or interrupting. 
It's one thing to "love the outdoors," but you take it a step further. You vow to "never" take an office job. You talk about the needs of your family, even though that family doesn't exist. And finally, you say the career you describe must "always" make you "happy."

These are my thoughts. You may choose to ignore them and I wouldn't blame you – especially after being compared to a 42 year old woman who can't find love. But since you asked…

Stop looking for the "right" career, and start looking for a job. Any job. Forget about what you like. Focus on what's available. Get yourself hired. Show up early. Stay late. Volunteer for the scut work. Become indispensable. You can always quit later, and be no worse off than you are today. But don't waste another year looking for a career that doesn't exist. And most of all, stop worrying about your happiness. Happiness does not come from a job. It comes from knowing what you truly value, and behaving in a way that's consistent with those beliefs.

Many people today resent the suggestion that they're in charge of the way the feel. But trust me, Parker. Those people are mistaken. That was a big lesson from Dirty Jobs, and I learned it several hundred times before it stuck. What you do, who you're with, and how you feel about the world around you, is completely up to you.

Good luck,

Mike

PS. I'm serious about welding and North Dakota. Those guys are writing their own ticket.

PPS. Think I should forward this to Claire?

Via Mike Rowe

Mike Rowe speaking at TED




Source: Must Triumph
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Sam Yang from an early age has been obsessed with connecting the dots between martial arts and efficiency, health, mindset, business, science, and habits to improve optimal well-being. For more info, join his newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter.

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