Tuesday, October 1, 2013

All Out Effort Mobility Training


By Sam Yang - Get similar updates here

Here is the protocol we use with all of our clients to help them not only move better, but also to resist (or treat) injuries.

1. Self Myofascial Release (SMR)


SMR focuses on the neural and fascial systems in the body that can be negatively influenced by poor posture, repetitive motions, or dysfunctional movements. These mechanically stressful actions are recognized as an injury by the body, initiating a repair process called the Cumulative Injury Cycle.

- Foam rolling is not appropriate for all clients, including those with congestive heart failure, kidney failure, or any organ failure, bleeding disorders, or contagious skin conditions. If you have medical issues, seek the advice of a medical professional before starting SMR or foam rolling activities.

Best tools for SMR being The Grid, The Rumble Roller, and The Massage Roller.

Here are some of the top foam roller exercises.

- These are general areas, but we will discuss specific areas and methods for our clients based on their movement assessments.

Check out our products list to see what tools you will need.

Calves (Gastrocnemius/Soleus)
Place foam roller under the mid-calf. Cross the opposite leg over the top of the other to increase pressure. Slowly roll calf area to find the most tender spot. Hold that spot for 30-90 seconds until the discomfort is reduced. Especially beneficial for runners or those who regularly wear shoes with elevated heels. Switch legs and repeat.

Adductors
Lie face down and place one thigh, flexed and abducted, over the foam roller. Slowly roll the upper, inner thigh area to find the most tender spot. Hold for 30-90 seconds until the discomfort is reduced. Switch legs and repeat.

Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL)
Lie on one side with the foam roller just in front of the hip. Cross the top leg over the lower leg, placing that foot on the floor. Slowly roll from the hip joint down toward the knee to find the tender spot. Hold for 30-90 seconds until the discomfort is reduced. Switch sides and repeat.

Piriformis
Sit on top of the foam roller, positioned on the back of the hip, crossing one foot over the opposite knee. Lean into the hip of the crossed leg. Slowly roll on the posterior hip area to find the tender spot. Hold for 30-90 seconds until the discomfort is reduced. Repeat on other side.

Latissimus Dorsi
Lie on one side with the arm closest to the ground outstretched with thumb facing upwards. Place the foam roller under the arm in the axillary region. Slowly roll back and forth to find the tender spot. Hold for 30-90 seconds until the discomfort is reduced. Repeat on other side.

Thoracic Spine
Lie on the floor with the foam roller behind the upper back. Cross arms to opposite shoulders. Raise hips off the floor and slowly roll back and forth to find the tender spot. Hold for 30-90 seconds.

Note - Avoid rolling out the low back due to dangers of injuring the spine.

2. Mobility Drills


What we want is range of motion prior to activity. Joint viscosity, warming of muscles, lengthening, injury prevention; not flexibility, more injury, or diminished power output. This is done prior to cardio, core, or strength training, but after SMR.



Assisted Mobility


For these you can pick up a stick from a hardware store or even use a broom stick. For the band, you can use a pull up band or a stretch strap.


3. Closing Stretches


Now we are working on flexibility. We do this only after we've completed all of our strength, core, and cardio work. Do this prior and you risk injury and diminished power. It may feel good because it stretches muscles and makes them relax, but it then makes it dangerous to pursue high intensity work because of stretched relaxed muscles. A common mistake of many who engage in fitness, to static stretch prior to activity.

Assisted Active Isolated Stretches


This is different from normal static stretching. You will need a rope or stretch strap.


Static Stretches


The very last thing you do.

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My name is Sam Yang. I'm a martial artist, entrepreneur, fitness nerd, information geek, and productivity nut. For more useful information, join my newsletter. You can also connect to All Out Effort on Facebook and Twitter.

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